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      Quintet and Sextet

      The Danish painter Christian Horneman painted Beethoven’s portrait in 1802, about six years after Beethoven composed his Opus 16 Piano Quintet.

      The Danish painter Christian Horneman painted Beethoven’s portrait in 1802, about six years after Beethoven composed his Opus 16 Piano Quintet.

      Beethoven: Quintet for piano and winds in E-Flat Major, Op. 16
      Robert Ingliss, oboe; Todd Levy, clarinet; Gabrielle Finck, horn; Theodore Soluri, bassoon; Jeremy Denk, piano

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      Beethoven was 26 in 1796 when he wrote his Quintet in E-Flat Major, possibly in homage to, and possibly inspired by, Mozart’s example. Marc Neikrug, the Festival’s artistic director, told host Kerry Frumkin that this piece is less about Beethoven’s relationship to Mozart as much as it is about a composer exploring with form and finding his voice in the process.

      Schulhoff: String Sextet
      Jennifer Gilbert, Harvey de Souza, violin; Scott Lee, Max Mandel, viola; Keith Robinson, Felix Fan, cello

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      “This is an incredibly harrowing and powerful piece,” explains Marc to Kerry.

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      Kerry and Marc discuss the end of Schulhoff’s String Sextet. Rather than writing a big finale, Schulhoff concludes the piece with a progressive diminution of sound, and the effect is startling.

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      Violinist Harvey DeSouza describes the inspiration that keeps him devoted to a life in music. “Imagine a great painting…” he says.

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      Since 1993 Harvey DeSouza has been a member of the esteemed Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. He organizes a chamber festival in India, and performs regularly on many of the world’s great concert stages. He had this to say about the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival: “Ever since the first time I came here it was a real revelation for me.”

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