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October 2014
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chicago symphony orchestra

CSO Will Roll Out with a Bang

Riccardo Muti on stage at Millennium Park, c. Todd Rosenberg

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra makes a joyful noise this weekend, performing to capacity crowds. Riccardo Muti opens the concert season with four sold-out performances of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, and a free Tchaikovsky concert at Millennium Park.

With orchestra and chorus declaring Friedrich Schiller’s Ode to Joy

Carlos Kleiber, A Reclusive Genius

CarlosKleiber

“Carlos has a genius for conducting, but he doesn’t enjoy doing it. He tells me, ‘I conduct only when I’m hungry’. And it’s true. He has a deep-freeze. He fills it up and cooks for himself and when it gets down to a certain level, then he thinks ‘Now I might do a concert’.” That

Christopher Maltman Tweets and Sings Beethoven, John Adams

Baritone Christopher Maltman, c. Pia Clodi

It is well established that opera singers can sing like canaries. Now we’re finding they tweet like them, too. Baritone Christopher Maltman used Twitter to share something of the on-stage and off-stage energy during his concerts with the Milwaukee Symphony earlier this year

CSO Principal talks Elgar and Muti

CSO Principal Cello John Sharp, Madrid, c. Todd Rosenberg

Anyone who has seen Riccardo Muti catch air on the podium, might be hard-pressed to think of him as an old dog. Last spring, the youthful, now 73-year-old conductor demonstrated his willingness to learn new tricks: he led the CSO in his first-ever performance of the Elgar Cello Concerto.

Summer Migration, Payoff for Chicago

Harris Hall, c. Timothy Hursley

If you’ve ever seen a nature documentary about the Serengeti, you might have some sense of the migratory patterns of classical musicians. There are music centers, like watering holes, to which players journey in order to refresh, commune with others, and nurture the young. The Aspen Music Festival is one of those places. One only has to read the biographies of Chicago’s top musicians

Is it Scary to Sing for Muti?

Riccardo Muti rehearsing the Chicago Symphony Chorus, photo by Todd Rosenberg

For Giuseppe Verdi’s Macbeth, which opens this weekend at Symphony Center, nearly three hundred people will come together under his baton; a chorus, an orchestra, and soloists who’ve collectively logged lifetimes in the practice room. One chorister admits, “When Muti comes out for that first rehearsal, it’s terrifying—but it’s amazing. He’s incredible.”

Muti Takes Orchestra to Cicero High School

Maestro Riccardo Muti

If you believe what you read, the town of Cicero has a troubled history. Iniquitous associations linger for decades, while saying nothing of the men and women who live, work, and raise families here. On Wednesday, the people of Cicero had the opportunity to show something of their fiber: world-renowned conductor Riccardo Muti

Web Exclusive Interview: From the Met to Maestro Muti

Albanian tenor Saimir Pirgu

Albanian tenor Saimir Pirgu is not wanting for work these days. The morning after a triumphant finish at the Metropolitan Opera (he sang Alfredo in Verdi’s La Traviata) he boarded a plane to Chicago. As it turns out, getting from New York to Chicago is a lot easier than getting from Verdi to Bach

Beyond Tristan

Portrait of Richard Wagner, Pierre-Auguste Renoir 1882

See the WFMT web exclusive video on the Chicago Symphony’s examination of Richard Wagner’s “Tristan und Isolde.”

The Planets at Ravinia

Based on the Chicago Public Library’s One Book, One Chicago, the Ravinia Festival’s One Score, One Chicago endeavors to engage the entire community in a single musical masterpiece. This year’s selection is Holst’s The Planets. The work will be performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the women of the Chicago Symphony Chorus at 8 more…