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      Archive for April, 2017

      April 30, 2017

      Chopin: Mazurkas, Op 33 (11:20)

      Ivana Gavric, piano

      British pianist Ivana Gavric is a performer of elegance, virtuosity and deep musicality, whose playing was described by BBC Music Magazine as of ”an altogether extraordinary caliber.” Her new album focuses on a variety of works by Chopin. Exploring her Slavic roots, Gavric brings clarity and intensity to these works by the mightiest of all composers for piano.

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      Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

      April 29, 2017

      Trad Armenian: Ov Siroon, Siroon (3:00)
      Trad Persian: Dokhtare Boyer Ahmadi (3:07)

      Ian Maksin, cello; Robert Garrett, percussion; Greg Nergaard, bass; Ronnie Malley, oud

      Known for his ability to blend different genres and styles, cellist, composer and vocalist Ian Maksin presents an eclectic mix of traditional music from different corners of the world. “Zaria” also features several of Maksin’s own compositions infused with Balkan rhythms, flamenco, Slavic chant, Mississippi blues and Argentine milonga.

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      Rating: 5.0/5 (5 votes cast)

      April 28, 2017

      Handel: Trio Sonata in E minor, Op 5 No 3 (10:36)

      Florilegium

      Regular performances in the world’s most prestigious venues have confirmed Florilegium’s status as one of Britain’s most outstanding period instruments ensembles. Since their formation in 1991, they have established a reputation for stylish and exciting interpretations. Their latest album combines trio sonatas by Handel with his nine German arias sung by soprano Gillian Keith.

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      April 27, 2017

      Mozart: Piano Concerto No 21 in C major, K 467 (29:25)

      Simone Dinnerstein, piano; Havana Lyceum Orchestra / José Antonio Méndez Padrón

      Simone Dinnerstein’s new album is a testament to the ability of music to cross cultural barriers. Her connection with Cuba started early with Solomon Mikowsky, a Cuban émigré who became her piano teacher when she was nine years old. When he inaugurated a music festival in Havana in 2013, he invited Dinnerstein to play. Returning in 2015, she played for the first time with the Havana Lyceum Orchestra and was deeply impressed. Within a year she had returned to record Mozart’s Piano Concertos Nos 21 and 23. 

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      Rating: 4.5/5 (2 votes cast)

      April 26, 2017

      Poulenc: Flute Sonata (12:49)

      Dionne Jackson, flute; Marija Stroke, piano

      French composers have created special ways of approaching the flute for evocative musical effects. Dionne Jackson’s program represents a wide range of French composers of the last century and their imaginative reactions to the possibilities of the flute. Jackson was the first American in more than a decade to receive First Prize in Flute from the Paris Conservatory while on a Fulbright grant. In her native Chicago, Jackson has held the position of assistant principal flute with Lyric Opera since 2001.

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      April 25, 2017

      Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde: Von der Jugend (3:08); Von der Schönheit (6:56)

      Jonas Kaufmann; Vienna Philharmonic / Jonathan Nott

      Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde is subtitled a Symphony for Tenor and Alto (or Baritone) and traditionally two voices have sung the six movements of the work. Jonas Kaufmann has decided to sing both parts himself, making this the first recording with one voice in all the songs. Last June, in the tradition-steeped Great Hall of the Vienna Musikverein, Kaufmann joined the Vienna Philharmonic and Jonathan Nott for this historic recording.

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      April 24, 2017

      Vaughan Williams: Symphony No 3, A Pastoral Symphony (36:56)

      Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra / Andrew Manze; Andrew Staples, tenor

      Andrew Manze’s interpretations of Vaughan Williams’s Symphonies have met with acclaim from audiences and critics alike. This second volume in his complete cycle with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra features Symphonies Nos 3 and 4. These two works were heavily influenced by World War I and its aftermath. The Third is often seen as a war requiem, and the Fourth is a violent and turbulent work, reflecting the post-war world and the political turmoil of the 1930s.

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      April 23, 2017

      Bach: Trio Sonata No 6 in G major, BWV 530 (12:19)

      Cellist Yo-Yo Ma, mandolinist Chris Thile, and bassist Edgar Meyer play works by J.S. Bach originally written for keyboard instruments, plus a sonata for viola da gamba. They last recorded together, with Stuart Duncan, on the Grammy-winning album The Goat Rodeo Sessions, which the Los Angeles Times called “haunting, invigorating, often breathtaking.”

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      April 22, 2017

      Beethoven: Symphony No 4 in B-flat major, Op 60 (33:00)

      Bonn Beethoven Orchestra / Stefan Blunier

      The Beethoven Orchestra of Bonn concludes its complete recording of the symphonies of the composer whose name it bears with two rousing performances. The Fourth and Seventh Symphonies bring together everything that Music Director Stefan Blunier has demanded of his musicians from the beginning of this cycle: emotional depth, gripping rhythms, frenetic energy, and powerful tension.

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      April 21, 2017

      Vieuxtemps: Élégie in F minor, Op 30 (6:47)
      Donizetti: La Favorita: O mon Fernand (3:40)

      Antoine Tamestit, viola; Cédric Tiberghien, piano

      This program features repertory that delighted Parisian concert halls and salons throughout the 19th century. It tells the story of how the viola, in the hands of great virtuosos, at last emerged from the violin’s shadow. Violist Antoine Tamestit, making his first solo recording for Harmonia Mundi, is joined by pianist Cédric Tiberghien to bring these stunning pieces back to life.

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      Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)