what’s playing now

      Lisa Flynn's New Releases

      Archive for November, 2014

      November 30, 2014

      Dvořák: Romantic Pieces, Op 75 (14:53)

      Renaud Capuçon, violin; Khatia Buniatishvili, piano

      It was Martha Argerich, Renaud Capuçon’s frequent duo partner and Khatia Buniatishvili’s mentor, who played musical matchmaker and brought these two performers together. Their concerts at the Lugano Festival in 2012 were such a resounding success that the friendship stuck. Together, the pair has devised a program of Romantic works for violin and piano by Franck, Grieg and Dvořák.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 3.0/5 (1 vote cast)

      Rossini: La Cenerentola: Overture (8:19)

      Santa Cecilia National Academy Orchestra / Antonio Pappano

      Continuing their series of Rossini recordings, Antonio Pappano and the Rome-based Santa Cecilia National Academy Orchestra follow three substantial works with an array of seven operatic overtures. Pappano says, “There’s something about Rossini that gives you a sense of the ideal Italian character type – his measured elegance, his modishess, his exhibitionism. I try to get the players of the orchestra to flaunt their italianità, which means basically a singing tone and warmth.”

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)

      Vivaldi: Clarae stellae, scintillate, R 625 (10:44)

      Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor; Ensemble Artaserse

      Philippe Jaroussky turns once again to the poignant meditation on grief that is the Stabat Mater — this time in Vivaldi’s beautiful 1712 setting — along with a selection of the Red Priest’s solo motets and sacred works. “After several recordings dedicated to lesser-known repertoire from composers such as J.C. Bach, Caldara and Porpora, I felt not only a musical need but also a physical yearning to return to Vivaldi,” says Jaroussky.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.7/5 (3 votes cast)

      Vivaldi, arr Lloyd Webber: Concerto in G major, R 545 (9:10)

      Julian & Jiaxin Lloyd Webber, cellos; European Union Chamber Orchestra

      The first arranger of Vivaldi’s concertos was Vivaldi himself, and Julian Lloyd Webber’s new versions on this recording reflect the composer’s pragmatic attitude and zest for experiment. Vivaldi’s Concerto in G minor, R 531, is his only original concerto for two cellos. Alongside this appear works both popular and recently discovered, the mercurial moods of the cellos representing instruments from mandolins to hunting horns.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.5/5 (4 votes cast)

      Bach: (Cello) Suite No 1 in D major (originally G major), BWV 1007 (17:19)

      Michael Nicolella, guitar

      With a repertoire spanning from J.S. Bach and Domenico Scarlatti to Jimi Hendrix and Elliott Carter, Michael Nicolella is recognized as one of America’s most innovative guitarists. On his new recording, Nicolella performs his arrangements of the six Cello Suites by Bach. He uses Bach’s own arrangement of the fifth suite for the guitar’s ancestor, the lute, as a template for the complete cycle.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 5.0/5 (7 votes cast)

      Villa-Lobos: Symphony No 10, Ameríndia: Finale (12:15)

      São Paulo Symphony Orchestra & Choir / Isaac Karabtchevsky

      Heitor Villa-Lobos was instrumental in developing a national Brazilian musical culture, writing in a wide variety of forms. Composed in 1954 for the 400th anniversary of the founding of São Paulo, Ameríndia is the composer’s largest symphony. Effectively a hybrid symphony and oratorio for soloists, chorus and orchestra, it is memorable for its stylistic variety and breadth, drawing on many different sources of Brazilian music.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 3.5/5 (2 votes cast)

      Brahms: Piano Sonata No 2 in F-sharp minor, Op 2 (28:35)

      Barry Douglas, piano

      Barry Douglas returns for the highly anticipated third volume in his series devoted to Brahms’ solo piano music, the first two volumes having been met with widespread critical acclaim. International Record Review wrote, “this is indeed Brahms playing of the utmost integrity and authority…this cycle looks to become a benchmark.” The latest installment includes Brahms’ Second Sonata, selected Intermezzi from the late collections of short piano pieces and the set of sixteen Waltzes, Op 39.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.0/5 (1 vote cast)

      November 23, 2014

      Mozart: Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216 (21:55)

      Lena Neudauer, violin; Deutsche Radio Philharmonic Saarbrücken / Bruno Weil

      At age 15, violinist Lena Neudauer won the Leopold Mozart International Competition in Augsburg, where she not only was awarded first prize, but also took home nearly all special awards. Neudauer’s beautiful, pure violin tone perfectly fits the spirit of Mozart’s supremely lyrical concertos. She is joined by conductor Bruno Weil, an expert in the music of the Viennese classicists and period instrument specialist.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 3.8/5 (5 votes cast)

      Mozart: Concert aria, Ch’io mi scordi di te?, K 505 (10:24)

      Joyce DiDonato, mezzo-soprano; Alexandre Tharaud, piano; Les Violons du Roy / Bernard Labadie

      Alexandre Tharaud returns with an album of music by Haydn and Mozart composed between 1777 and 1786, including Mozart’s early masterpiece the Piano Concerto No 9, Jeunehomme. The album sees Tharaud reunite with old friends: the award-winning French-Canadian chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy under their music director Bernard Labadie, and mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato in Mozart’s concert aria Ch’io mi scordi di te?.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.0/5 (2 votes cast)

      Schubert: Moments musicaux, D 780: No 1 in C major (5:14)
      Mazzoli: Isabelle Eberhardt Dreams of Pianos (8:42)

      Shai Wosner, piano

      In his third recital album on the Onyx label, Shai Wosner pairs works by Schubert with those by Brooklyn-based composer Missy Mazzoli. Both of Mazzoli’s pieces on the album take their inspiration from the Schubert works that accompany them: Isabelle Eberhardt Dreams of Pianos is a meditation on Schubert’s A-major Sonata and A Map of Laughter is influenced by the fourth movement of Schubert’s Moments musicaux.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 3.5/5 (4 votes cast)