what’s playing now

      Lisa Flynn's New Releases

      Archive for May, 2012

      May 27, 2012

      Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Love’s Labour’s Lost, Op 167: Four Dances (16:16)

      Malmö Symphony Orchestra / Andrew Mogrelia

      Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco’s two Piano Concertos form a contrasting pair. Concerto #1, written in 1927, is a vivid and witty example of his romantic spirit. Concerto #2, composed a decade later, is a darker, more dramatic work. The Four Dances from Love’s Labour’s Lost, part of the composer’s recurring fascination for the art of Shakespeare, receive their first recording.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.7/5 (3 votes cast)

      Gluck: Orfeo ed Euridice: Act II, Scene I (13:20)

      Kathleen Ferrier, contralto; Netherlands Opera Chorus & Orchestra / Charles Bruck

      2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of English contralto Kathleen Ferrier. This 3CD set celebrates some of her finest recordings, including excerpts from Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice, Mahler’s Kindertotenlieder with Bruno Walter (including two previously unissued takes) and a wide variety of songs and arias recorded with pianist Gerald Moore.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

      Beethoven: Piano Sonata #21 in C, Op 53, Waldstein (22:55)

      HJ Lim, piano

      The 24-year-old Korean pianist HJ Lim has recorded her first project for EMI Classics — an ambitious traversal of the complete Beethoven Piano Sonatas. EMI will release the set on iTunes for only $9.99, a strategy commonly used with compilations but never with a new release until now. A Yamaha exclusive artist, HJ Lim was also the first to record the complete sonatas on a Yamaha CFX concert grand piano.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 3.0/5 (6 votes cast)

      Kaijo Saariaho: Vent nocturne: II, Soupirs de l’obscur (5:49)
      Anonymous (14th century): Three Dances (5:48)

      Garth Knox, viola; Agnès Vesterman, cello; Sylvain Lemêtre, percussion

      On his new album, “Saltarello,” Garth Knox traverses almost 1,000 years of music, playing the viola, the medieval fiddle and the viola d’amore, a forgotten member of the viola family with an extra set of strings vibrating underneath the fingerboard. Knox says the intrument appeared and then disappeared in musical history.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.5/5 (2 votes cast)

      Anonymous: Requiem aeternam (3:54)
      Nick Drake: From the morning (3:28)

      Joel Frederiksen, bass; Ensemble Phoenix Munich

      Joel Frederiksen and Ensemble Phoenix Munich pay tribute to one of the great singer/songwriters of the past 50 years — Nick Drake (1948-74). Under fine melodic lines is a rhythmically driving guitar part which Frederiksen has arranged for Renaissance instruments. Parts of the plainsong Requiem Mass interweave with Drake’s finely crafted songs and music of composers from the Renaissance.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.6/5 (8 votes cast)

      May 20, 2012

      Bach:Brandenburg Concerto #11 in D minor (Reconstruction by Bruce Haynes) (14:32)

      MontrealBaroque Band / Eric Milnes

      Every year since its inception in 2003, ATMA has partnered with the Montreal Baroque Festival. This recording represents a project which will be given during the 2012 festival: “New Brandenburg Concertos”, in essence, unpublished Bach! This is the reconstruction of six concertos by Bruce Haynes from cantata movements by Bach, played by the Montreal Baroque Band under the direction of Eric Milnes.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.0/5 (5 votes cast)

      Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988: Variation 24 to Aria (reprise) (22:53)

      David Jalbert, piano

      Recorded last June at Palais Montcalm in Québec City, the Goldberg Variations marks a milestone in the career of this celebrated young Canadian pianist. David Jalbert’s previous ATMA recordings — music of John Adams, Philip Glass, Beethoven and Shostakovich — have been met with accolades and awards.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.8/5 (4 votes cast)

      Bruckner: Symphony #7 in E major: Scherzo (10:25); Finale (14:16)

      BerlinStaatskapelle / Daniel Barenboim

      Recorded live at the Berlin Philharmonie, this recording captures a truly gripping performance of Bruckner’s 7th Symphony. It was part of a landmark event – Daniel Barenboim’s week-long Bruckner cycle with his Berlin Staatskapelle in June 2010. The concert featured on this recording drew 13 minutes of uninterrupted applause from the audience.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

      Britten: Serenade for Tenor, Horn & Strings, Op 31 (24:47)

      Mark Padmore, tenor; Britten Sinfonia / Jacqueline Shave

      Celebrated tenor Mark Padmore joins the Britten Sinfonia in some of the most beautiful English music for voice and orchestra. The centerpiece is Britten’s magical evocation of nightfall, the ‘Serenade’ (with Stephen Bell, horn). In Gerald Finzi’s war-time cycle ‘Dies natalis,’ the ecstatic mood reflects a child’s wide-eyed wonder at the world. Britten’s poignant ‘Nocturne’ completes the album.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 4.0/5 (2 votes cast)

      Debussy: Suite bergamasque (16:52)

      Inon Barnatan, piano

      Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan debuts on Avie with an album of colorful and atmospheric masterpieces by French composers Ravel and Debussy, and Englishmen Thomas Adés and Ronald Stevenson. Inspired by the title track, Adés’ Darknesse Visible—a wondrous and dreamlike prism on the John Dowland song “In Darkness Let Me Dwell”— Barnatan chose works that are linked by different characteristics of darkness in the music.

      VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
      Click stars to rate:
      Rating: 5.0/5 (4 votes cast)