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      Lisa Flynn's New Releases

      July 24, 2016

      Mozart: Flute Quartet in D major, K 285: II, Adagio (3:55); Clarinet Concerto in A major, K 622: III, Rondo (8:36)

      Richard Galliano, accordion; Bertrand Cervera & Stéphane Hénoch, violins; Jean-Paul Minali-Bella, viola; Raphaël Perraud, cello; Sylvain Le Provost, double bass

      Accordionist Richard Galliano again forges new paths in classical music with this album of well-known Mozart pieces. The third album of classical repertoire from the legendary jazz accordionist follows his successful albums of Bach and Vivaldi. Here he enlists the help of a talented quintet of string players to perform transcriptions of Eine kleine Nachtmusik, the Clarinet Concerto and more.

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      July 23, 2016

      Sibelius: String Quartet in D minor, Op 56, Voces Intimae (31:21)

      Leipzig String Quartet

      Jean Sibelius achieved fame first and foremost for his orchestral music, but at the beginning of his career, he primarily wrote chamber music. The String Quartet in A minor from 1889 dates from this early period. Two decades later, he completed the Quartet in D minor, Op 56. A spare and brooding work, the subtitle, “Intimate Voices,” suggests the inward quality of the music.

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      July 22, 2016

      Marenzio: Jubilate Deo (3:16)
      Bertolusi: Ave verum corpus (5:23)
      Pacelli: Christus resurgens (5:52)

      The Sixteen / Eamonn Dougan

      The fourth volume in this highly acclaimed series explores the music of Italian composers working in the Polish court during the reign of Sigismund III Vasa. In 1594, Sigismund III set about reorganising his music ensemble and he decided to bring in Italian musicians, many associated with the chapels of Rome. Among them were Luca Marenzio, Asprilio Pacelli, and Vincenzo Bertolusi. Their arrival heralded a new dawn for sacred music in Poland.

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      July 21, 2016

      Mahler: Symphony No 10 (performing version by Deryck Cooke): Adagio; Scherzo I (34:20)

      Seattle Symphony / Thomas Dausgaard

      Written in the summer of 1910, Symphony No 10 was Gustav Mahler’s final work. At the time of the composer’s death, the composition was not fully orchestrated, and was unperformable. The version performed here is the Deryck Cooke final version. The Seattle Symphony presents this monumental composition under Principal Guest Conductor Thomas Dausgaard. On this live performance: “It was impossible to be in the house and not realize that something rare and significant had taken place.” (The Seattle Times)

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      July 20, 2016

      Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 30 in E major, Op 109 (17:32)

      Ivan Ilić, piano

      Ivan Ilić is a pianist with a wide-ranging curiosity, reflected in his many recordings. After exploring the groundbreaking music of Morton Feldman, Ilić returns to the basics on his latest album. He performs the Second Partita by J.S. Bach, Three Intermezzi, Op 117, by Brahms, and Beethoven’s Sonata No 30.

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      July 19, 2016

      Granados: Intermezzo from Goyescas (5:35); Danza de los ojos verdes (3:48); Danza gitana (3:21)

      Barcelona Symphony Orchestra / Pablo González

      Revered as one of the greatest Spanish composers for the piano, Enrique Granados also wrote a wide-ranging body of orchestral music. His one-act opera Goyescas contains an intensely lyrical Intermezzo that is his most popular work and one of the best-loved pieces in all Spanish music. The gypsy-tinged orientalism of Danza de los ojos verdes and Danza gitana contrast with the somber and epic La nit del mort and the ambitious large-scale symphonic poem Dante.

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      July 16, 2016

      Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances (6:24)
      Géza Hosszu-Legocky, violin; Martha Argerich, piano

      Luis Bacalov: Porteña (Latitud 34°36’30”) (22:19)
      Martha Argerich & Eduardo Hubert, pianos; Swiss Italian Orchestra / Alexander Vedernikov

      Brahms: Clarinet Trio in A minor, Op 114 (26:52)
      Paul Meyer, clarinet; Gautier Capuçon, cello; Nicholas Angelich, piano

      In June 2016, Martha Argerich – both a phenomenal pianist and a much-loved mentor to young musicians – celebrates her 75th birthday before hosting the 15th edition of the Progetto Martha Argerich at the Lugano Festival in Switzerland. These 3 CDs bring together thrilling performances from the 2015 Progetto, where Argerich was joined by such eminent musicians as Stephen Kovacevich, Nicholas Angelich, Gautier Capuçon and Lilya Zilberstein and by a dazzling array of young talent.

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      July 15, 2016

      Debussy: La boîte à joujoux (The Toy Box) (32:29)

      Seattle Symphony / Ludovic Morlot

      Stravinsky’s much-loved ballet Petrushka receives a beautiful performance in this live recording by the Seattle Symphony. Alongside this titan of a work is the little-known children’s ballet by Debussy, La boîte à joujoux (The Toy Box). The Stravinsky recording is part of the Symphony’s ongoing live performance recording series of orchestral works by the composer, following The Rite of Spring released in 2014.

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      July 14, 2016

      Schnittke: Suite in Old Style (15:26)

      Roman Mints, viola d’amore; Olga Martynova, harpsichord; Andrey Doynikov & Dmitri Vlassik, percussion

      Russian violinist Roman Mints plays the music of Alfred Schnittke on his latest album. Mints says, “Schnittke’s works for violin and piano cover every period of his creative life, and could even be an ideal guide to his world. For anyone who didn’t live in the Soviet Union, this might be hard to understand, but for me, this music is precisely about us, about that life, those pains, those joys, about the things you couldn’t say out loud but which you could whisper in the ear.”

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      July 13, 2016

      Liszt: Piano Sonata in B minor (33:32)

      Nicholas Angelich, piano

      One of the most respected pianists of his generation, American Nicholas Angelich has a firm reputation as a soloist and chamber musician. As the title of his new album suggests, the repertoire Angelich has selected comes full circle, by way of dedications from three of the 19th century’s greatest pianist/composers. Schumann’s Kreisleriana was dedicated to Chopin, two of Chopin’s Op 10 Etudes were dedicated to Liszt, and Liszt’s B minor Piano Sonata was dedicated to Schumann.

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