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Introductions

Rebroadcast: 18 year old pianist Wonjin Hahn

18 year old pianist Wonjin Hahn is a senior at Conant High School.

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This evening we present a rebroadcast of a program that first aired in December, 2011.

A senior at James B. Conant High School in Hoffman Estates, Wonjin Hahn is a scholarship recipient and member of the Music Institute of Chicago’s Academy program where he studies piano with MIC artist faculty member Alan Chow. Wonjin has studied in the United States, South Korea, and China during his eleven years as a pianist. His principle teacher during those years was Dr. Haysun Kang at Loyola University Chicago.  In 2011, Wonjin was a winner in the Steinway Young Artists Competition, and he won Second Place in the Music Festival in Honor of Confucius Competition. That same year, he performed with his piano quintet as part of the Gail Borden Library Concert Series in Elgin, Illinois. He attended the Bienen School of Music’s summer pre-collegiate program in 2009, and the summer International Institute for Young Musicians in 2011. Wonjin’s various musical activities have included accompanying choirs and singers, playing in a jazz combo, playing clarinet, and singing in the chamber choir at his high school.

In our interview, Wonjin mentioned his interest in composing pop and rap music and recommends that those interested in learning more about rap begin with Eminem and Twista.

Program:

R. Schumann: Abegg Variations, Op. 1

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Beethoven: Sonata No. 21, Op. 53 “Waldstein”
I. Allegro con brio
II. Introduzione: Adagio molto
III. Rondo: Allegretto moderato – Prestissimo

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C. Debussy: L’isle Joyeuse

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  • Janeen Devine

    The H.M.S. Pinafore set sail on this date in 1878. Now give three cheers!

  • Georgia Fountoulakis

    Might anyone have the lyrics to Mikis Theodorakis Song of Praise Ode to Zeus?

  • Debra

    Carl recited the lyrics to the All Souls Song this morning, November 2nd, between 8:18-8:34 a.m. He did this preceding the beautiful song. Does anyone know the name of the song – I would really like to search for a copy of the lyrics. Beautiful!!

  • carlo Julio

    It would be nice to have a list of all the selections played during Carl’s program, why are tehy not listed in the schedule?

  • Armando

    Amor brujo is more properly translated as Wicked Love.
    It is one of those phrases that you can get lost in translation when translated word by word.

  • Jennifer Richards

    I love listening to your morning programs. They are always fun and interesting. I would like to hear Guide to Britten by Flanders and Swann and some of Donald Swann’s other songs that are not usually heard. Whatever you can dig up would be great.

  • Jennifer Richards

    What are the other music compositions, manuscripts and other lost music that has been discovered? I mean works such as the original version of Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1. I remember some Mozart manuscripts. Can you make a list of theses?

  • Mitchell Marks

    I recall going to a performance of “Prometheus: Poem of Fire” in around 1969 or 1970 by the Yale Symphony Orchestra (probably directed by John Mauceri), using not the original design of the color organ, whatever that might have ended up as, but instead a laser-based light show — in those days a laser show was still a possible thing. Members of the audience were given reflective shoulder covers or caps, and were asked to don any sparkly clothing or jewelry we might have brought. (I don’t recall if we were given eye protection or advised to wear our own sunglasses.) I mostly remember the novelty of the occasion, and nothing really about the music and performance!

    • Mitchell Marks

      And here is a 2010 news article about a similar performance to be staged at that time. It mentions previous performances in 1969 and 1971. (The 1969 one must be the one I attended.)

      http://news.yale.edu/2010/01/15/scriabin-s-prometheus-be-performed-yale-living-color

    • Whit Shepard

      …and I was backstage at Woolsey Hall shouting cues to the four people running the lightboard after the hall had been filled with sal ammoniac for 10 minutes before the performance began to provide a medium so that the multi-colored lasers could be seen all around and among the audience. It was a collaboration between Mauceri and Richard N. Gould, then a student at the Architecture School, who was and is an absolute genius. Scriabin never had it so good.

  • Phil Perry

    For the 5:58 club, I would like to request Liszt, S558, it’s called something about wasser zu singen or zu singen … wasser is in the title , maybe it’s supposed to sound like a waterfall, but it’s beautiful.

  • Lauretta

    I was delighted to be able to listen to the Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet in the car a little while ago, extending my drive so I could hear the entire recording. This has been one of my favorite pieces of music for a very long time, beginning in the 1950’s when the ballet using this score was performed by one of the visiting ballet companies. Does anyone recall whether it was the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, American Ballet Theatre, or __ ?

  • Mitchell Marks

    I was aware of the elder John Corigliano, by name, long before his son the composer arrived on the scene. On an LP of Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade” that my family had in my youth, concertmaster Corigliano was credited for his playing of the solo violin part.

  • John Shade

    The anti-Trump slant in Carl Grapentine’s news summaries is making me regret the contributions I’ve made to the station for years. Intelligence operatives in the Obama administration monitored the communications of the president elect and his staff and then improperly disseminated them throughout the government and to the media, yet Grapentine’s news briefs would lead you to think that the scandal is not the intelligence community’s Watergate-like abuse of authority but Trump’s inexact word choice (accusing Obama of wiretapping him instead of surveilling him).

    Every time Carl shows his anti-Trump partisanship, I become less likely to continue supporting this station.

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