Latin-American Music with Elbio Barilari
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      Upcoming Programs

      The Louisville Orchestra

      LP Treasures: Louisville Orchestra Recordings

      This week we dig through our old LPs and find rare and adventurous recordings made by the Louisville Orchestra of Blas Galindo, Joaquín Nin-Culmell, and Roberto Garcia Morillo.

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      Leonardo Balada

      Leonardo Balada: Composer

      Leonardo Balada, born in Catalonia in 1933, currently teaching at the School of Music at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, is, for many, the most important living Spanish composer. Fiesta dedicates this program to his work and thinking.

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      Mstislav Rostropovich

      New Music from the Past

      Musical memory is a strange thing. What is remembered and what is not often times is decided by the particular taste of one era or just by chance. Hidden treasures from the past are being discovered every day.

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      Conlon Nancarrow (1912-1997)

      Conlon Nancarrow (1912-1997)

      Exiles and Émigrés

      Displacement due to political causes has been sadly common throughout history. By force or by choice composers (and other artists) have abandoned their homeland to become exiles or migrants in a different country. Fiesta! examines the cases of Manuel de Falla exile in Argentina, Rodolfo Halfler in Spain and Mexico, and Conlon Nancarrow becoming an American-Mexican composer.

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      Recent Programs

      Francisco Mignone (1897-1986)

      Francisco Mignone (1897-1986)

      Latin American and Spanish Piano

      Heitor Villa-Lobos was such a dominant character in Brazilian music that other great composers from his generation or younger have been obscured by him. Francisco Mignone and Mozart Camargo Guarnieri were two brilliant composers younger than Villa-Lobos (born in 1887). They are widely respected in Brazil but their international reputation has been overshadowed by Villa-Lobos’ gargantuan image and personality. Fiesta! continues championing their music in this case featuring recent recordings of their piano music.

      Leonardo Balada is a living Catalonian composer. He moved to the US in 1960 to study at Juilliard School. Since 1970 he has been teaching at Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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      Colonial Music from Perú & Bolivia

      Once one of the richest regions on Earth, the Vice-royalty of Perú was one of the key components of the Spanish Empire. Music started to be printed and published there, for the first time in this side of the Atlantic.

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      Sepharadic Migrations

      Sepharadic Migrations

      Memories from Sefarad

      Sefarad is the name the Spanish Jews gave to Spain, hence their denomination as Sephardic people. Expelled from Spain alongside the Muslims, their culture, and their language, the Ladino, have been preserved in Northern Africa, Greece, Turkey and the Netherlands. Over several hundred years many Sephardies migrated to the Americas, specially Mexico, the US, Argentina and Uruguay. Nowadays there is a strong Sephardic community in Israel too. Fiesta pays a new visit to this tradition.

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      Federico García Vigil

      Federico García Vigil

      Smiles and Tears

      Here we indulge in creative examples of wit and humor in Latino music, from a Jazz rendition of Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto to a Latino version of Ravel’s Bolero. Then true to the Latino style after all the fun this program introduces the painfully serious “Ollantay” by Alberto Ginastera. It could have been exactly the opposite…

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      What's Happening

      10th Annual Latino Music Festival Chicago September 10-November 22

      Presented by the International Latino Cultural Center (ILCC), The Latino Music Festival (LMF) produces performances and promotes awareness of music from Latin America, Spain and Portugal, ranging from the Colonial period to the 21st century. The Latino Music Festival functions as a bridge, bringing Latin American classical music to audiences in Chicago. At the same time, the LMF fulfills an educational role by bringing this music to Chicago’s neighborhoods and surrounding suburbs through concerts and educational programs. In addition to a roster of internationally acclaimed artists participating annually in the Festival and its programs, the Latino Music Festival places a strong emphasis on local talent, featuring Chicago’s most prestigious orchestras, ensembles and soloists, as well as a number of talented young professionals. The LMF commissions new pieces from Latino composers and features world, US and/or Chicago premieres of works both new and historical. The Festival also has a residency program for chamber ensembles and soloists which focuses on the dissemination of the Ibero-American repertoire.