Exploring Music

Archive for July, 2010

Exploring Music: I Lost It At The Movies

This week’s program “I Lost It At The Movies” is based off of Pauline Kael’s book of the same title. If you wanted to purchase the book, check out our link here: http://www.amazon.com/Lost-at-Movies-Pauline-Kael/dp/0714529753/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1280540855&sr=8-3

The beginning of this week’s program starts with music from the very first score ever composed for a film, produced by Camille Saint-Saëns.

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Bernard Herrmann snags his first job scoring music to what may be one of the most influential films of all time.

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Steve McQueen’s 1968 film “Bullitt” guides us to new fronts when it comes to jazz (and car chases) in film scores in the late 60’s.

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Sergio Marconi creates wonderfully Erie music for 1968 film “Once Upon a Time in the West”, starring Charles Bronson.

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Bill tells us how directors like Stanley Kubrick made his films without commissioning a composer to create a film score, but used pieces of classical music which already exist. Bill also tells us about the scores one of his childhood heroes.

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Exploring Music: Artists in Exile, Part II

Paul Hindemith tries to impress Adolf Hitler. After being turned down, he decides leave Germany for Turkey, then eventually ends up residing in the United States.

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Dedicaded to the memory of FDR, Hindemith creates a piece from Walt Whitman’s famous poem ‘When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d’, which has a haunting attribute to the piece.

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This famous scientist’s speech against the development of the hydrogen bomb is put to music. Find out how it happened here:

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Many of the composers that we’ve listened to so far have come to America because they have been exiled from their homelands in Europe, but when the ‘Red Scare’ hits the United States these artists are exiled once again.

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Paquito D’Rivera, a Cuban composer and performer, wanted to get out of Cuba while it was under Castro’s regime. Hear about his suprisingly easy escape here:

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Arnold Schoenberg relaxes

Everybody’s got to take a little vacation sometime

Raisin Brahms PSA

For all of you Johannes Brahms fans……

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Exploring Music: Artists in Exile, Part I

This week’s program covers Artists in Exile, based off of Joseph Horowitz’s book of the same title. If you wanted to purchase the book, check out our link here: Joseph Horowitz – Artists in Exile

Within the introduction to this week’s program, Bill finds a hidden birdsong inside the lines of a string quartet composed by Antonín Dvořák.

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Erich Korngold was seen by many as a child prodigy, but his career really shone when he began to score films for Hollywood.

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The exiled composers that we are looking at this week came to this country to lead new lives, but only because they had nowhere else to go.

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Korngold travels back to the US in 1938 to create the score for the new Errol Flynn film Robin Hood, just barely leaving before Germany’s invasion of Europe.

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Béla Bartók was persuaded to come to the United States by the request of a few of his fellow Hungarian friends who were stationed there, but not before the death of his sick and dying mother.

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Exploring Music: Mahler Symphonies, Part II

Gustav Mahler’s symphonies are so unique that many interpreters fail to preform the music correctly; Leonard Bernstein, of course, nails it:

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Can you place the difference in personality between Beethoven and Mahler? Author Deryck Cooke might have phrased it perfectly:

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Bill discovers one of Mahler’s pieces has lyrics to it, he even takes a shot at singing the piece! Hear Bill’s performance here:

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Mahler had a hard time when he relocated to New York later in his life. Hear what Gustav’s daughter, Anna, had to say about the few memories of her father:

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Mahler’s tenth symphony is fueled by the love he feels toward his wife, and the sorrow that their relationship brought:

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Brahms’ famous vuvuzela chorale (Symphony No. 1)

For the World Cup fans…

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And from The Onion…

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